EEG – Electroencefalograma

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EEG – Electroencefalograma

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that detects electrical activity in your brain using small, flat metal discs (electrodes) attached to your scalp. Your brain cells communicate via electrical impulses and are active all the time, even when you’re asleep. This activity shows up as wavy lines on an EEG recording. An EEG is one of the main diagnostic tests for epilepsy. An EEG may also play a role in diagnosing other brain disorders.
Sleep Studies: Sleep studies are tests that record what happens to your body during sleep. The studies are done to find out what is causing your sleep problems.
Sleep studies can also determine whether you have a problem with your stages of sleep. The two main types of sleep are non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM). Normally, NREM and REM alternate 4 to 5 times during a night’s sleep. A change in this cycle may make it hard for you to sleep soundly.
Video EEG Monitoring: Long-term electroencephalographic monitoring (LTM) is the capability of recording the EEG over long periods of time and not a specific duration. Prolonged EEG recording is used primarily for epilepsy monitoring. The purpose of LTM is to expand the limited time sampling associated with shorter “routine” EEG recording. Audiovisual monitoring may also be used in conjunction with LTM to evaluate simultaneously a specific clinical behavior that may or may not be associated with EEG alteration. LTM is used most frequently in the diagnosis and management of seizures and “spells,” but has also gained wider application in the evaluation of sleep disorders, cerebrovascular disease, psychiatric conditions, and movement disorders. Computer-assisted LTM systems that process, analyze, compress, and store data digitally have become widely available in clinical practice both in the hospital as well as outside the hospital when the patient is ambulatory

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