Evoke Potential

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Evoke Potential

Evoke potential test measures the time it takes for nerves to respond to stimulation. The size of the response is also measured. Nerves from different areas of the body may be tested. Types of responses are: Visual evoked response or potential (VER or VEP), which is when the eyes are stimulated by looking at a test pattern, Auditory brain stem evoked response or potential (ABER or ABEP), which is when hearing is stimulated by listening to a test tone, Somatosensory evoked response or potential (SSER or SSEP), which is when the nerves of the arms and legs are stimulated by an electrical pulse.
Each type of response is recorded from brain waves by using electrodes taped to the head. The visual evoked response (VER) is the most commonly used evoked potential test in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS).
Conducting gel and electrodes are applied to the scalp. The location will depend on the type of response being recorded. For example, when VERs are recorded, the electrodes are applied to the rear (occipital region) of the scalp over the brain areas that register visual stimuli.

Developmental delay (Genetics, Mental retardations, down syndrome, Fetal alcohol syndrome, learning disability, fragile x syndrome)  
Developmental disabilities are issues that kids don’t outgrow or catch up from, though they can make progress.
Developmental delays may be caused by short-lived issues, such as a speech delay being caused by hearing loss from ear infections or a physical delay being caused by a long hospitalization. Delays may also be early signs of learning and attention issues. While it’s not always clear what is causing the delay, early intervention can often help kids catch up. Some kids still have delays in skills when they reach school age. In that case, they may be eligible to receive special education services.
Five Areas of Skill Development and Possible Delay
Cognitive (or thinking) skills: This is the ability to think, learn and solve problems.
Social and emotional skills: This is the ability to relate to other people.
Speech and language skills: This is the ability to use and understand language.
Fine and gross motor skills: This is the ability to use small muscles (fine motor), particularly in the hands, and large muscles (gross motor) in the body. Babies use fine motor skills to grasp objects. Toddlers and preschoolers use them to do things like hold utensils, work with objects and draw. Babies use gross motor skills to sit up, roll over and begin to walk. Older children use them to do things like jump, run and climb stairs
Activities of daily living: This is the ability to handle everyday tasks. For children, that includes eating, dressing and bathing themselves.

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